Coda's Supporting Documentation

Continuing the discussion from WithName behaviour:

@Xyzor_Max, yes. It is challenging because every user, including Codans(!), has a different use case and different skill level. Even if Coda hired a team of content management wizards 🧙‍♂️ you still end up with a concept that @Paul_Danyliuk introduced me to:
image

Said a different way via the community archives … [this quote] :point_down:

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Max, a person would be hard pressed to find a company more in tune with user needs than Coda. (for example, CEO Shishir embed it into the culture from the earliest days :headphones:@26:29 to 27:47)

:heavy_plus_sign: I agree with your podcast comment. I had already asked for it (twice) by 2019-11-19

Being solution oriented :bulb:

:handshake: :shamrock:

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@Christiaan_Huizer, thank you for sharing your thoughts :handshake:

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As usual, great input @jeo :man_student:

IN CONTEXT TO YOUR MESSAGE:

When it comes to community post, I recommend users to bookmark posts that are of their interest (personal choice, depending on the areas you want to use Coda for and your skill set at the moment)

Then download them all - do this for example every quarter and add the new ones to your KB.

And then the magic begins by importing them in Coda, tagging the posts in a way it has a meaning for you. Make connections, add samples, screenshots, copy other relevant info and your knowledge base starts to get shape.

:exclamation: Furthermore: :exclamation:

I really recommend everybody to actually practice/do what you want to learn, only reading and thinking you will remember isn’t enough and your learning process will speed up. :speedboat:

Use templates, sample documents to see how others have solved a similar challenge and try to re-create it yourself in a sample doc. - Share it with the community if you need support.

Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and the feeling when you have build something yourself is amazing and satisfying.

There will always be people that know Coda better then you, but have in mind the majority of the people in the world knows much less then you. :thinking:

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Hi All

I would like to agree with what @Christiaan_Huizer & @Jean_Pierre_Traets in combination mentioned above: There comes a time when the standard documentation just do not work anymore, because of one’s knowledge, the breadth of the product and the frequency of the product updates.

It also depends on what you look for in documentation:

  • A description of how the tool (Excel, SAP or Coda) works, or
  • A description of how to implement certain use-cases.

I am an FICO S4/HANA consultant, and we have the same problem there - SAP brings out up to three version’s of S4/HANA. Each upgrade has a release note, covering all the functionality impacted by that release. This covers finance, sales, material management, product planning and control, project management, etc, etc. To find something in SAP’s documentation is a nightmare. Add to that blogs and videos from 3rd parties, usually of extremely dubious quality…

What I have recently started doing is to use Coda to build my own “Help infrastructure”. One table is called Interesting Stuff. (Each of my SAP, Personal, and Coda docs has this table.) Every time I find an interesting video, SAP help file, blog or Wiki entry, I use the Coda Chrome extension to store the URL, and a tag(s) for the document.

This document (SAP or Coda) is now solely focused on topics of my interest. For example, I have information on product costing in a repetitive production, make to stock environment. I do not look at anything around make to order, be it make to production order, make to sales order or engineer to order.

Similarly, for Coda, I do not collect anything black magic like APIs, I stick to the basics.

If you are interested, here is the link to my FICO SAP black book Coda doc. It is currently for personal use only, but I have started tidying it up for possible public use going forward. Maybe for a fee… :wink:

Many happy ramblings for the new year!
Rambling Pete

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