Expand Formula Editor

The formula Editor is very small and hard to work with, especially for bigger formulas. If we could expand it this would help a lot :pray:

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@Jay_Lefebvre + 1 to this.

AND the community has hacked a way around it. Take a look here:

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@Johg_Ananda

Oh I didn’t see that one. Unfortunately my CSS knowledge is pretty limited, I tried to make this work with the extension but didn’t have much success :confused: If someone could write down a clear step by step that would be super helpful (to other users as well) :pray:

Thank you

I vote for this as well. Some formulas get hard to read.

Yes larger formula editor, please.

A couple of more suggestion to improve readability of the code:

  1. Ability to save snippets of code as text columns to be injected in other formulas with an evalAsCode() function. This would help a lot to reduce the size of code inside formulas and re-use certain code modules.

Example: a button creates multiple rows with a formula map and execute a set of actions on each iteration. I would like to have the long code for each action in a separate text field to be injected inside the formulamap(), and ideally being able to use “Currentvalue” in the separate code to be injected

  1. Have a “disable formula if” property for columns, like you have for buttons, with the options to return a custom value. Now I’m using a conditional statement inside the formula code itself, but it’s not ideal at all, because it overwhelms the code, especially when you have already nested conditionals.

The following code is a nightmare for me to work with every time I need to modify anything. The formula editor is too tiny.
Also note that the code is overwhelmed by an additional layer of conditional statement used just to disable/enable the formula. (point 2.)

if([Grid Controls].[Exact val]=false,   if([Catalogue Controls].fast_loading, " " , if(thisRow.[Combined Tags].count()=0, CATALOGUE.Filter(If([Grid Controls].[Include not rated], [zero-five-rating]  , Rating) <=[Grid Controls].[Filter by Rating].nth(1)), thisRow.[Combined Tags].Filter(If([Grid Controls].[Include not rated], [zero-five-rating]  , Rating)<=[Grid Controls].[Filter by Rating].nth(1))) )  ,       
   if([Catalogue Controls].fast_loading, " " , if(thisRow.[Combined Tags].count()=0, CATALOGUE.Filter(If([Grid Controls].[Include not rated], [zero-five-rating]  , Rating) =[Grid Controls].[Filter by Rating].nth(1)), thisRow.[Combined Tags].Filter(If([Grid Controls].[Include not rated], [zero-five-rating]  , Rating)=[Grid Controls].[Filter by Rating].nth(1))) ))
2 Likes

Dear @Andr,

Great feedback :+1: +1 from me.

Or to be able to save these snippets to your account, to be global available, like we have the templates available

:bulb:
Great idea, wondering why I have never been thinking in this direction, although we are using it also in the buttons like you mentioned!

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Easy to do .

image

  .RvM32e-t { 		
     height: 200px; 	
}

also //comments and local variables would be of huge help in the perspective of having a cleaner and more compact code to work with.

I can’t add more columns to use as variables, as I have 40+ columns in my table. Things are already messy. :smiley:

Psst, this is possible with some black magic, but of course I discourage that because you can break your doc easily.

Your code is indeed a nightmare. Perhaps you didn’t know about SwitchIf()?

SwitchIf(
  thisRow.ThisShouldBeDisabled,
  "",

  Condition1 = true,
  Something.Count(),

  Condition1 = false AND Condition2 = true,
  SomethingElse.Count(),

  ElseValue
)

I use this to “disable” formulas for some rows, just setting the first conditional branch to return blank ""

Also felt like practicing some black magic today:

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